sara-starshine/gonnagetmysoulfree —> feminerdy

"Seek unity, unity builds the Church and comes from Jesus Christ. He sends us the Holy Spirit to build unity!" -Pope Francis, June 2013

Thanks to @brillotweet for the link!

can I please have #2?

(Source: holotapes, via ohmypreciousgirl)

omg why have I written a bajillion drafts of this JVC autobiographical essay

why can’t I get this crap RIGHT? 

“There I went again, building up a glamorous picture of a man would would love me passionately the minute he met me, and all out of a few prosy nothings.”
— Sylvia Plath

nervy:

tardis-mind-palace:

immrsromanreignsbitch:

bleedingshadows94:

Try to tell me that there is no pressure on men to have a good image. Try me, mother fucker.

Double standard right here, and it ain’t cool!

THANK YOU

someone finally fucking points it out

some 34k notes…I don’t even want to live on this planet anymore. please let some of them be saying how ridiculously unlike real life for fat women this is.
and you know what’s gross? calling anyone the “human embodiment of sloth” just because they’re fat, male or female. forreals. smh!

nervy:

tardis-mind-palace:

immrsromanreignsbitch:

bleedingshadows94:

Try to tell me that there is no pressure on men to have a good image. Try me, mother fucker.

Double standard right here, and it ain’t cool!

THANK YOU

someone finally fucking points it out

some 34k notes…I don’t even want to live on this planet anymore. please let some of them be saying how ridiculously unlike real life for fat women this is.

and you know what’s gross? calling anyone the “human embodiment of sloth” just because they’re fat, male or female. forreals. smh!

(Source: makuta-tobi, via rollinginthesheep)

“Scar tissue has no character. It’s not like skin. It doesn’t show age or illness or pallor or tan. It has no pores, no hair, no wrinkles. It’s like a slip cover. It shields and disguises what’s beneath. That’s why we grow it; we have something to hide.”
—Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted

I just really wish google hangouts were actually a proper substitute. #takemebacktoGB

yeah I’m hashtagging…I’m lonely, bored out of my mind, going stir crazy, and have 6 more weeks of it. so don’t judge me. 

lenalot:

okay so none of you really shared your thoughts on the liturgy with me when i asked because you’re all LAME

but what are your thoughts on open communion? it’s something i’ve (up till now) just accepted the Catholic teaching on. It sort of makes sense to me that it would be a public sign of communion, unity, etc. on the other hand, jesus says “take this, ALL OF YOU”, and does it really make sense for the waitstaff of the church to withhold something Christ offers so freely?

so idk. please share your thoughts on open communion? i’m working stuff out and i’m interested in various perspectives. or recommend literature on the topic. also if you’d like to recommend any literature on anglican theology that would be appreciated. 

?

HI so I don’t follow you but I saw this reblogged on my dash and wanted to share my perspective. then my laptop battery died in the middle of my reply, which maybe was a good thing because I was going all hardcore theology. I do want to point out that there’s definitely a spectrum of open/closed communion, but more than anything, I think maybe the best thing I can do in share a personal experience instead. It’s a bit long, but bear with me if you can!

Over new years, I was at a fabulous missions conference, and on one of the last nights we had communion. Imagine a stadium full of some 1600+ people doing this together. But I’m Catholic, and the communion was not. I felt torn! Because on the one hand, wow, I had been part of this wonderful and diverse gathering of God’s church all week and what is a more beautiful expression of that than sharing communion together? But on the other, I knew as a Catholic I really shouldn’t do it.

There I was,  sitting in the crowded and weirdly-lit darkness frantically googling if it was ever licit to take non-Catholic communion and freaking out that someone next to me would think I was weird/generally judge me if I didn’t. when the MC made an announcement. Though we were surely a significant minority, he recongised there were some who came from traditions that do not practice an open table/in whatever way kept us from participating fully in communion. He recognized we might be feeling pressured. I still remember just how thankful I was to hear his words — it felt like he was saying them just to me. I invite you to participate at any level and in any way that you are comfortable

So, was I truly comfortable participating fully? No, I really wasn’t. Taking the little broken up pieces of exactly whatever it is we were using might have made me feel, in that moment, I was participating, yes. But I was also acutely aware that the answers to questions like “What is the Eucharist?” and “What does it mean to receive it?” were markedly different for me than the friend sitting next to me. The answers to those questions mattered more than any desire I had to not feel left out or judged, to belong, .or what have you (especially after a brutal day that week in which I felt alienated and unwanted during a seminar about Catholics and Protestants in missional partnership). But you know what? Not participating fully didn’t mean I did not belong, that I was missing out on something, or that I wasn’t participating at all. 

Communion gathers together the faithful in so many ways, one of them being belief… and even though beliefs about communion are not united, closed communion can feel like we are purposely dividing ourselves in disunity to those who don’t practice it. To those who do, the reverse can sort of feel like lying because let’s face it, the church isn’t what one would call unified in identity of belief. But putting all of that aside, what I think my experience in January teaches me is that there is always something special and unique about the act of communion — and I don’t even mean the act of taking it. The Holy Spirit is wonderfully present and moving at any Eucharistic celebration, at any gathering of believers. In that stadium, even though all we were doing was passing around tiny pieces of some sort of bread sheet on paper plates, I was overwhelmed by the fact that I was praying and experiencing fellowship with thousands of diverse Christians, “full participation” or not. 

Christ does offer himself freely in communion, regardless of whether it’s Catholic, Lutheran, Baptist, nondenominational, Reform, etc. Albeit in different theological ways. I definitely think you’re right about that. So while I think open communion is nice (even if I don’t take it, it does feel good to be invited), I do think it works best where communities have similar theology concerning the Eucharist. Because denominational diversity is different than diversity in the Kingdom — things like ethnic, cultural, and racial diversity. Denominational diversity doesn’t have to stop us from coming together despite differences. I think closed communion should ask us not to judge who is or is not invited to the table, but to be aware of those differences in theology and practice. Open communion while those differences still cause clashes, tension, and disunity does not reflect the body of Christ unified in the way it should be. And there’s still a lot of that out there between Christian groups. I think closed communion should call us better understand each other, to learn, because out of those things come respect and love, which do bring us closer together, just as does prayer, song, praise, and fellowship.

I don’t know if this was helpful at all, but that’s what I think!


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